Psychometrics

By Randy Sabourin

I often find myself in the situation of giving professional advice about whom in a group of ‘up and coming’ professionals will be a good leader.  I coach executives in large and small organizations in a variety of market places and there seems to be one critical common denominator among these leaders; the more self-aware they are about their strengths and weaknesses the more successful they are. A small caveat to that statement- they are not only self-aware but are willing to do something with their self-knowledge.

Being self-aware is a little more difficult than introducing yourself to your self in the mirror or reading (and dismissing) your latest 360 evaluation. Understanding yourself is a complex and ongoing process, one you need to be dedicated to in order to see results. I recently tried an app that tracks the calories you take in at every meal. I’ve never been a dieter but I found the process very interesting because I became aware of what I was eating, when and what my caloric intake was. Based on that information I started making decisions about what or how much I would eat, I became aware of what I was eating. As the experience continued I recorded the details of each meal less and less, I felt I had gained an understanding and didn’t need the feedback any longer. Sure enough the success I had gained by being aware faded and I was back to the same eating habits. I started using the app again and I was back in the groove, reaching my goals, staying aware, and receiving positive reinforcement.  The same awareness and feedback cycle is needed in order to increase your leadership self-awareness.

Leadership self-awareness is based on understanding your behavioral preferences, particularly when you are under stress.  Anyone can manage his or her behavior in a calm situation; managing behavior under pressure is much harder.  Performance in the moment- under pressure- is often the difference between success and failure.  Without self-awareness we react to stressful situations consistent with our core behavioral preferences. Behavioral preferences rarely change over time; they are neural pathways created over time and are a combination of nature and nurture that are usually set in our early 20’s. If changing them is near impossible then our objective is to manage them along with the stress that exposes them.

Where to start? Read the rest of this entry »

The Challenge

Three individuals from various leadership positions (Branch Manager, District VP, Commercial Branch Area Manager) within the Personal and Commercial division of a large Financial Institution required assistance to overcome challenges in inter-personal and communication style. All three individuals have been recognized as potential leaders in the organization and are in line for promotion if these issues can be resolved. The Bank’s traditional coaching process had yielded minimal results.

The Client

ASCI was appointed by the VP of Human Resources and Talent Management of the Personal and Commercial division of a large Financial Institution. Behavioral analysis (TAIS) of each individual revealed a consistent leadership profile that emphasized Analytical/Conceptual as the dominant attentional style combined with a very high need for Control, higher than average Expression of Criticism & Anger and a very high Response Style Influence.

Objectives

Each Coachee had unique manifestations of the behaviors that were creating issues with their teams and clients. Although the situations and symptoms were different, the objective of the sessions was consistent.

  1. Have the coachees accept that the challenges they are facing are a result of their behavioral preferences.
  2. Explore the behavioral issues highlighted by TAIS and tie them to situations and challenges.
  3. Develop awareness to recognize adverse behaviors and employ mechanisms to modify the behavior.

Strategies

Each coaching engagement started with a face-to-face meeting, where possible, so that the coach and coachee felt comfortable with each other. The relationship is built on trust and mutual respect. The session content included:  Read the rest of this entry »

The Challenge                                                                                        (download the pdf)

An established Executive Team of twelve including two new members was struggling to reach agreement on several major strategic initiatives.  The decision making process was being negatively affected by interpersonal communication styles and political agendas. Due to diverse interests and personalities, major strategic projects were being stalled. The situation was affecting the performance of the Executive Team, was poor role modeling for the rest of the organization and increased the costs associated with the stalled projects. The organization was engaged in several significant change projects and the inability of the Executive Team to “pull the trigger” would affect other projects and company confidence.

The Client

ASCI was appointed by the CEO of a large multi-national insurance company to work with the Executive Team. The team consisted of the CEO, CIO, CFO, Executive VPs from regional areas and market segments, Legal Consul, and the Chief Commercial Officer. Behavioral analysis (TAIS) of the team revealed that the dominant attentional style was Analytical/Conceptual combined with a relatively slow decision making preference and a very low propensity to risk. Read the rest of this entry »

Anderson Sabourin Consulting Inc (ASCI) is pleased announce that we are launching the Local Interest Group of the NeuroLeadership Institute in Toronto. We would like to invite you to join us for our inaugural meeting.

When: Thursday March 10th, 5::30pm to 7:00pm, light snacks and beverages will be available.

Where: The Aon Building 20 Bay Street, Toronto on the 24th floor.

Cost: There is no cost to for this event.

Topic: This meeting will be a presentation and discussion focused on David Rock’s Influence & Collaboration Model SCARF. This event will be a forum to discuss the theory and applications of the brain-based team dynamics, leadership and coaching leveraging research and concepts presented by the NeuroLeadership Institute.

Meeting Format: For this and future meetings a topic will be presented by someone within the NeuroLeadership research community or a local practitioner followed by an open discussion. No sales or solicitation will be tolerated. Our objective is to create an open forum for discussion, learning and application.

Topic Overview: The SCARF model is a brain-based model for understanding how teams can work together more successfully. Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness and Fairness are described as the foundation for successful interaction between two or more people. You can find the full article SCARF: a brain-based model for collaborating with and influencing others, by David Rock here.

We have established a Linked In Group where additional information and discussion will be posted.

Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting on March 10th so we can prepare appropriate accommodations.

Hope to see you there,

Randy and Cam

www.anderson-sabourin.com

Hello X, Anderson Sabourin Consulting Inc (ASCI) is pleased announce that we are launching the Local Interest Group of the NeuroLeadership Institute in Toronto. We would like to invite you to join us for our inaugural meeting.

When: Thursday March 8th, 5::30pm to 7:00pm, light snacks and beverages will be available.

Where: The Aon Building 20 Bay Street, Toronto on the 24th floor.

Cost: There is no cost to for this event.

Topic: This meeting will be a presentation and discussion focused on David Rock’s Influence & Collaboration Model SCARF. This event will be a forum to discuss the theory and applications of the brain-based team dynamics, leadership and coaching leveraging research and concepts presented by the NeuroLeadership Institute.

Meeting Format: For this and future meetings a topic will be presented by someone within the NeuroLeadership research community or a local practitioner followed by an open discussion. No sales or solicitation will be tolerated. Our objective is to create an open forum for discussion, learning and application.

Topic Overview: The SCARF model is a brain-based model for understanding how teams can work together more successfully. Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness and Fairness are described as the foundation for successful interaction between two or more people. You can find the full article SCARF: a brain-based model for collaborating with and influencing others, by David Rock here.

We have established a Linked In Group where additional information and discussion will be posted.

Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting on March 10th so we can prepare appropriate accommodations.

Hope to see you there,

Randy and Cam

NL
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www.anderson-sabourin.com

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